The Watch Collector’s Matrix

Do you sometimes feel like you spend all your time putting out proverbial fires in your life? At the end of the day do you feel completely sapped and drained of energy, and yet can’t point to anything of real significance which you accomplished that day? Yes? Well then, you are probably confusing the urgent with the important!

In terms of watch purchasing decisions, people tend to have similar problems – where the ‘importance’ is replaced with ‘desire’ – since the purchase of a luxury watch is rarely important. I will talk about the Eisenhower matrix before exploring The Watch Collector’s Matrix in its application to watch purchasing decisions.

Nudge – Improving decisions

I was reading this book by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein entitled “Nudge” – in the book they evaluate choices, biases and the limits of human reasoning from several perspectives. They tell stories about how they trick themselves to becoming victims of the very limitations of thought that they are describing. This is telling, because the very fact that these educated, articulate professionals can trick themselves (even though they know what is happening) demonstrates how tough it is to think clearly. We fall prey to systematic errors of judgment all the time – however, one of the ways of harnessing this issue is to help others make better decisions.

Opinions

Some Friday wisdom. Opinions are like arseholes. Everyone has one… in the same way that you don’t go around worrying about everyone else’s arseholes… you ought to do the same with their opinions too.

Is it worth having children?

René Descartes was a French 17th century philosopher, most famous for his saying “I think therefore I am”. What makes him stand out for me, is that he was a fierce rationalist – relying on reason as the best guide for belief and action. This was in an age when many philosophers backed up their arguments with appeals to god, Descartes trusted in nothing more than the power of human logic. I am no philosopher, but I do see myself as a fierce rationalist too, often relying on logic to solve many of my own conundrums. It is with this logical hat on, that I would like to discuss the topic of having children, and why this may, or may not be a good idea. My overall conclusion is that while young children may bring many moments of joy and positives to young parents, the real reason for having children is the benefits to the parents when they get old.

4 ways to quiet imposter syndrome and start believing in yourself

This was quite a timely read for me. I, unfortunately, work on a team where nobody at a working level is quite sure what we are collectively trying to achieve; i.e. the longer term goals of the team, and indeed the corporation, are simply not clear to anyone. Repeated attempts to urge leadership to work…

6 Habits of Truly Memorable People

In order to succeed, almost everyone—whether business owner or employee—must be memorable. Out of sight is out of mind, and out of mind is out of business.

How To Stop Being Angry

Instead of being angry bout something and going on with your day while being angry, why not lose the anger? No, it’s not terribly easy, but it’s also not monumentally hard. Below, ten ways to quickly dump 95% of anger on any topic right out of your head.

The Biggest Wastes Of Time We Regret When We Get Older

We spend a lot of energy looking for shortcuts to save time, and sure, those shortcuts add up. But when I look back, my biggest time regrets aren’t spending too much time on Twitter or mismanaging my daily tasks. Those are bad habits, but there are bigger, more systematic time wasters that have really gotten in the way. Fixing these will free up a massive amount of time and energy.

If You’re Too Busy to Meditate, Read This

This morning, like every morning, I sat cross-legged on a cushion on the floor, rested my hands on my knees, closed my eyes, and did nothing but breathe for 20 minutes. People say the hardest part about meditating is finding the time to meditate. This makes sense: who these days has time to do nothing?…

Michael Lewis’s Princeton Commencement Speech

Lewis’s life experiences and research has led him to believe that luck plays a huge role in determining one’s success (or lack of success). Students graduating from Princeton are by most people’s standards extremely lucky. These individuals may feel a sense of entitlement, but they should not forget the role luck has had in their…