Watch collecting and happiness

In general, it turns out that happiness is fairly heritable, but there is of course more to it than that. Here we will talk about some basic nuances that will affect your happiness, and describe how the variability in your happiness is affected by external factors. Finally, trying to connect it to watches, the argument and variability is largely a function of the company you keep, and what you are exposed to most frequently.

Kindness, evolution and paying it forward

A number of different random events led me to write this post. First, I saw a post on Instagram where someone was offering to introduce other watch collectors to their authorised dealer to help them land some ‘hard to get’ pieces; second, I posted a story about my friend who has been kidnapped in South Africa and received a lot of support and possible avenues to assist; finally, I am doing a course on Psychology (for fun) and this topic of kindness came up again – A few thoughts came to mind which I thought I would like to note down, since I find it fascinating why we might be inclined to be kind to one another (or not).

The Watch Collector’s Matrix

Do you sometimes feel like you spend all your time putting out proverbial fires in your life? At the end of the day do you feel completely sapped and drained of energy, and yet can’t point to anything of real significance which you accomplished that day? Yes? Well then, you are probably confusing the urgent with the important!

In terms of watch purchasing decisions, people tend to have similar problems – where the ‘importance’ is replaced with ‘desire’ – since the purchase of a luxury watch is rarely important. I will talk about the Eisenhower matrix before exploring The Watch Collector’s Matrix in its application to watch purchasing decisions.

Nudge – Improving decisions

I was reading this book by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein entitled “Nudge” – in the book they evaluate choices, biases and the limits of human reasoning from several perspectives. They tell stories about how they trick themselves to becoming victims of the very limitations of thought that they are describing. This is telling, because the very fact that these educated, articulate professionals can trick themselves (even though they know what is happening) demonstrates how tough it is to think clearly. We fall prey to systematic errors of judgment all the time – however, one of the ways of harnessing this issue is to help others make better decisions.

Opinions

Some Friday wisdom. Opinions are like arseholes. Everyone has one… in the same way that you don’t go around worrying about everyone else’s arseholes… you ought to do the same with their opinions too.

The BS asymmetry principle

Brandolini’s Law – this is the simple observation that it’s far easier to produce and spread BS, misinformation and nonsense than it is to refute it.

Is it worth having children?

René Descartes was a French 17th century philosopher, most famous for his saying “I think therefore I am”. What makes him stand out for me, is that he was a fierce rationalist – relying on reason as the best guide for belief and action. This was in an age when many philosophers backed up their arguments with appeals to god, Descartes trusted in nothing more than the power of human logic. I am no philosopher, but I do see myself as a fierce rationalist too, often relying on logic to solve many of my own conundrums. It is with this logical hat on, that I would like to discuss the topic of having children, and why this may, or may not be a good idea. My overall conclusion is that while young children may bring many moments of joy and positives to young parents, the real reason for having children is the benefits to the parents when they get old.

4 ways to quiet imposter syndrome and start believing in yourself

This was quite a timely read for me. I, unfortunately, work on a team where nobody at a working level is quite sure what we are collectively trying to achieve; i.e. the longer term goals of the team, and indeed the corporation, are simply not clear to anyone. Repeated attempts to urge leadership to work…

Quote of the day…

I thought this was such a simple quote, but so meaningful… One can apply its relevance in a myriad of situations, and really hit the spot for me today. I hope you appreciate it too!