10 irrational human behaviours and how they apply to watch collecting

Dan Ariely is one of the most interesting people I have ever come across… I could go on about his various TED talks or the rest of his incredible CV – but you can enter that rabbit hole another time. Today, I wanted to cover Chris Yeh’s Outline of Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces that Shape Our Decisions. It’s one of Ariely’s most fascinating books… and takes a peek into the predictable psychology that powers human actions and reactions. As always, I’ll try and pick out some lessons we can apply to our world of watches. Here’s Ariely’s list…

The Paradox of Choice – quasi book summary and discussion

Barry Schwartz is an American psychologist, Professor of Social Theory and Social Action at Swarthmore College, and since 2016 has been visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley. His work focuses on the intersection of psychology and economics… He is also the author of the book “The Paradox of Choice” and he talks about the concepts from the book in this TED talk. In this post I wanted to outline some of the key points he makes, and connect them to a watch collector’s decision-making processes.

Never split the difference (Negotiation) – Book review and summary

Chris Voss is a former FBI hostage negotiator, TED speaker, author of Never Split the Difference: Negotiating as If Your Life Depended on It. In this book, Voss uses his experiences from dealing with crises to explain how many of his tactics are actually applicable to normal folks like you and I. As he puts it, “Getting…

How to raise successful people – book summary

Author, mum and teacher Esther Wojcicki says “There’s a real lack of understanding of what parenting is about”. Parents might be fearful that their child will fail, or anxious that they’ll make irreparable mistakes, and this fear and insecurity come from a place of love – but the result is a generation of anxiety-plagued, helpless young people. This book is about the “Woj Way” that stresses trust, respect, independence, collaboration and kindness (TRICK) – and how this approach will help you raise children who become self-reliant, capable and confident adults.

Psychology of money – book summary and thoughts

I happened to see a book recommendation from a friend on Instagram last week, and decided to give it a whirl – I found it to be a very enjoyable read, particularly for the stories shared in this book. Morgan Housel makes the point that financial know-how is actually less of a hard science than you might think. Unlike in other fields, in finance an unknown petrol station attendant with a high school education might make millions, while a celebrated, Harvard-educated finance executive goes bankrupt. It all boils down to behaviour. Housel explores why psychology has more to do with positive financial outcomes than our math skills.

Nudge – Improving decisions

I was reading this book by Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein entitled “Nudge” – in the book they evaluate choices, biases and the limits of human reasoning from several perspectives. They tell stories about how they trick themselves to becoming victims of the very limitations of thought that they are describing. This is telling, because the very fact that these educated, articulate professionals can trick themselves (even though they know what is happening) demonstrates how tough it is to think clearly. We fall prey to systematic errors of judgment all the time – however, one of the ways of harnessing this issue is to help others make better decisions.

Be Like Amazon

I decided to do another book summary post, since I found it so useful and insightful. This one is by brothers Jeffrey Eisenberg and Bryan Eisenberg, writing with Roy H. Williams. They analyse Amazon’s principles through the eyes of two imaginary characters on a road trip. The book is basically a dialogue between the older…